Snazzy post and beam in Pasadena asking $1.4M

By Pauline O’Connor

Stirring up the market in Pasadena this week is a classic post and beam that’s had the same owner since being built in 1959.

Located at 300 Anita Drive in the San Rafael Hills, the two-story residence is described as “a nod to Buff and Hensman” in its listing copy, quite justifiably. Measuring 2,187 square feet, its signature features include tongue-and-groove beamed ceilings, an open floor plan, a slate fireplace, built-in storage and seating, clerestory windows, and the requisite walls of glass.

Along with three bedrooms and two and a half baths, it’s got a spacious lower level family room, an expansive dining patio with picturesque treetop and mountain vistas, and a wooded lot of 8,403 square feet.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...

Gorgeous Mid-Century In Pasadena, $1.375M

By Philip Ferrato

A real estate unicorn, this 1959 Post+Beam has been put on the market by the estate of its original owners in original but beautifully maintained condition. And while no architect has been identified, this house is very much of its time, and in a way that’s rarely seen today.

If we had to make an educated guess, we’d choose Eugene Weston III, a third-generation architect who worked in and around Pasadena and Orange County. Some of Weston’s signature details appear here: the cantilevered hearth and exposed smokestack chimney flue; the very simply detailed kitchen cabinets that form their own partitions and have a peek-a-boo opening to the living area; a cooktop facing a window and the view; the visually featherweight wood window frames containing expanses of glass.

Weston was also once quoted in the LA Times as saying “…the house is the last of the handcrafted objects” which, considering the explosion of furniture, ceramics, and textiles produced in the Post War era (especially in California) seems… shortsighted.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...

The Romance Of Concrete And Steel In Laurel Canyon, $1.875M

By Philip Ferrato

Since the 1950s, Laurel Canyon has been a neighborhood of innovative architecture, and this new project by the architecture firm Mutuo joins that long tradition. Tasked by the developer to create three homes on a steep downslope, the firm placed the homes dramatically against a 20-foot-high retaining wall, creating room for deeply shaded patios, plus extensive roof decks, for an abundance of outdoor space.

The simple palette of materials, with cedar shingles, whitewashed shotcrete (a type of industrial-grade stucco) and blackened steel, all evoke a mood rarely seen in the Hollywood Hills.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...

Q3 2019 Market Report

A guide to market performance and analysis. Explore your neighborhood today.

You Might Also Like...

October 2019 Newsletter

You Might Also Like...